Pill Popping Culture Youth on Health

Pill Popping Culture  Youth on Health

Pill Popping Culture Youth on Health

Given the nature of  life that we lead, it doesn’t come as a surprise that, we find ourselves suffering from an array of health issues. With mounting pressure, causing people of all ages to buckle, we toil on with a weakened immunity, more vulnerable than ever, to a web of diseases. What concerns me, however, is not our susceptibility to illness but, the tendency towards self medication and the consequent overmedication.

Self care has been a permanent feature of active healthcare, for many years. People are more proactive, regarding their health and keenly pursue information, from what they consider expert sources, to help them take informed decisions. This regime of self care is encouraged by both the government and the health insurers. .Self-medication (where appropriate) reduces the increase of third party expenditure, in health care. In this self- care, pharmacists act as advisors, to the public.

In this endeavour, the responsibility not only lies with the patient but also with the pharmacist and the manufacturers of these non-prescription drugs. Pharmacists have a professional obligation to provide sound advice about self treatment and the medicines that are available for it. They act as intermediaries between the customer and the manufacturer. They must communicate the reactions of the consumers, towards  the products, to the manufacturers. It is their moral duty to ensure that those seeking their advice don’t misuse medicines and approach the doctor, when necessary.

However, the reality doesn’t quite resemble this idealistic approach. Blatant misuse of over-the-counter drugs, by the patients, lack of proper information about medicines, all pose a severe threat to health.

Given the nature of  life that we lead, it doesn’t come as a surprise that, we find ourselves suffering from an array of health issues. With mounting pressure, causing people of all ages to buckle, we toil on with a weakened immunity, more vulnerable than ever, to a web of diseases. What concerns me, however, is not our susceptibility to illness but, the tendency towards self medication and the consequent overmedication.

Self care has been a permanent feature of active healthcare, for many years. People are more proactive, regarding their health and keenly pursue information, from what they consider expert sources, to help them take informed decisions. This regime of self care is encouraged by both the government and the health insurers. .Self-medication (where appropriate) reduces the increase of third party expenditure, in health care. In this self- care, pharmacists act as advisors, to the public.

In this endeavour, the responsibility not only lies with the patient but also with the pharmacist and the manufacturers of these non-prescription drugs. Pharmacists have a professional obligation to provide sound advice about self treatment and the medicines that are available for it. They act as intermediaries between the customer and the manufacturer. They must communicate the reactions of the consumers, towards  the products, to the manufacturers. It is their moral duty to ensure that those seeking their advice don’t misuse medicines and approach the doctor, when necessary.

However, the reality doesn’t quite resemble this idealistic approach. Blatant misuse of over-the-counter drugs, by the patients, lack of proper information about medicines, all pose a severe threat to health.

The widespread availability of non-prescription drugs is rapidly leading to a pill-popping culture. Most people, instead of visiting a doctor, resort to self medication – using these drugs. There seems to be a tablet for every conceivable illness  and some designed even for the unimaginable, thanks to the crafty approach of the pharmaceutical industry. It’s yet another manifestation of the ‘easy way out’ culture. Unfortunately, people can only see a glimmer of false light at the end of the tunnel of drug culture. In their inherent haste to be done with whatever is pulling them down; people tend to forget Paracelsus’ words that, “All drugs are poisons.”

People’s sensitivity to drugs varies considerably. A suitable dose for one, may prove to be an overdose for another. Thus, it is ill-advised for a person to subject himself or herself to such mitigating danger. Self medication usually involves proprietary drugs which are available over the counter such as: anti-allergics, vitamins, antacids, painkillers and laxatives. Another hazard is the availability of many irrational drug combinations, in the market, which expose the individual to several drugs, needlessly  Each of these drugs can cause adverse effects. Very few combinations have a legitimate place in modern medicine. Yet, irrational combinations abound and are also being used by some professionals.

Thus, to avoid or minimize the dangers of self-medication, firstly, the layman should be educated about the dangers of the indiscriminate use of drugs. Secondly, the physicians should be more judicious in prescribing, and must insist on drugs being supplied by the chemists, only on a valid prescription.

Always in a flaming rush, we take the sanctity of our health into our misinformed and unprofessional hands. Consequently, we tend to attack symptoms as opposed to addressing the true problems. We apply Band-Aids to overcome the moment as opposed to tourniquets, which are actually needed. We are easily satisfied with solving small problems as opposed to conquering major challenges.

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